Architekturzeitung: Cooperative living in the Gropiusstadt

Architekturzeitung: Cooperative living in the Gropiusstadt

100th Bauhaus anniversary. 50th anniversary of Walter Gropius's death. Against this background, our project on the Theodor-Loos-Weg, which picks up on Gropius's idea of ??a leap and introduces it to the modern age, is given a very particular topicality.

Walter Gropius wanted to turn the arable land on the southern outskirts of Berlin into a garden city and turn the Gropius city into a showcase district. The plan was to have twelve high-rise buildings arranged in a circle, harmoniously embedded in green residential areas with five-storey buildings and single-family homes. But the policy braked his ambitious plans. Scattered urban planning was after the wall construction as a waste of space, the houses were higher, closer together, the originally planned variety of apartment types increasingly limited. Due to the lack of housing, the originally planned 14,500 apartments were converted into 19,000 - predominantly in chain-shaped rows of apartments with up to 31 floors. Gropius Ideal had to give way to a reality that quickly led to the problems he had warned about. Feeling deprived of his urban planning goals, he wrote in a letter to the former Berlin mayor Rolf Schwedler in 1963: "Unity in diversity is the desirable goal, not boring monotony."

Our cooperative project on the Theodor-Loos-Weg is geared towards Gropius Masterplan, who planned to integrate smaller buildings in the high-rise district: the 20-storey high-rise is connected via a common pedestal to a five-storey townhouse and a single-storey pavilion. A generous entree as a place of exchange and encounter is open to residents and neighbors alike. Here you will find a concierge service as well as a spacious lobby with a small library and a café. In the pavilion event rooms and a cinema hall are planned. In addition, there will be a Living Kitchen, which invites you to cook together with friends and neighbors. The new building incorporates the architectural design vocabulary of the high-rise district built in the 60s and 70s and translates it into the modern age.